Town Chinatown

Some articles on town chinatown, town, chinatown:

Oregon College Of Oriental Medicine - History
... research and treats patients at its Old Town Chinatown campus (OCOM Clinic), and at its Southeast Portland and Hollywood neighborhood clinics. 2009, to move from Portland's eastside to a historic building in downtown's Old Town Chinatown district. 2012, the school moved into its new home in Portland's historic Old Town Chinatown neighborhood ...
Old Town / Chinatown (MAX Station)
... The Old Town/Chinatown station is a station in the MAX Light Rail system served by the Blue and Red lines ... It is located in the Old Town Chinatown neighborhood in Portland, Oregon and is currently the 7th stop eastbound on the Eastside MAX (It was the sixth in the original Eastside Max line, until the ...
Downtown Portland - Bridges
... the CBD from the east side Burnside Bridge, connecting the east side to downtown and the Old Town Chinatown neighborhood Steel Bridge, the only double-deck bridge with independent ...
Portland Neighborhoods - Sections - Northwest
... includes the Pearl District, most of Old Town Chinatown, the Northwest District, and various residential and industrial neighborhoods ... District and the Willamette is the Old Town Chinatown neighborhood ... It includes Portland's Chinatown, marked by a pair of lions at its entrance at NW 4th Ave ...
Neighborhoods In Portland, Oregon - Sections - Northwest
... Portland includes the Pearl District, most of Old Town Chinatown, the Northwest District, and various residential and industrial neighborhoods ... Between the Pearl District and the Willamette is the Old Town Chinatown neighborhood ... It includes Portland's Chinatown, marked by a pair of lions at its entrance at NW 4th Ave ...

Famous quotes containing the word town:

    A township where one primitive forest waves above while another primitive forest rots below,—such a town is fitted to raise not only corn and potatoes, but poets and philosophers for the coming ages. In such a soil grew Homer and Confucius and the rest, and out of such a wilderness comes the Reformer eating locusts and wild honey.
    Henry David Thoreau (1817–1862)