Tourism in France

Tourism In France

France attracted 78.95 million foreign tourists in 2010, making it the most popular tourist destination in the world.

France has 37 sites inscribed in UNESCO's World Heritage List and features cities of high cultural interest (Paris being the foremost, but also Toulouse, Strasbourg, Bordeaux, Lyon, and others), beaches and seaside resorts, ski resorts, and rural regions that many enjoy for their beauty and tranquillity (green tourism). Small and picturesque French villages of quality heritage (such as Collonges-la-Rouge or Locronan) are promoted through the association Les Plus Beaux Villages de France (litt. "The Most Beautiful Villages of France"). The "Remarkable Gardens" label is a list of the over two hundred gardens classified by the French Ministry of Culture. This label is intended to protect and promote remarkable gardens and parks. France also attracts many religious pilgrims on their way to St. James, or to Lourdes, a town in the Hautes-Pyrénées that hosts a few million visitors a year.

Tourism is accountable for 6% of the country's income (4% from French tourists travelling inside France and 2% from foreign tourists), and contributes significantly to the balance of payments.

Read more about Tourism In France:  Paris, French Riviera, Loire Valley, Notable French Cities, Other Parts of France, Theme Parks, Most Popular Sites By Number of Visitors, Gallery

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Famous quotes containing the words france and/or tourism:

    I shall not bring an automobile with me. These inventions infest France almost as much as Bloomer cycling costumes, but they make a horrid racket, and are particularly objectionable. So are the Bloomers. Nothing more abominable has ever been invented. Perhaps the automobile tricycles may succeed better, but I abjure all these works of the devil.
    Henry Brooks Adams (1838–1918)

    In the middle ages people were tourists because of their religion, whereas now they are tourists because tourism is their religion.
    Robert Runcie (b. 1921)