Totto-Chan: The Little Girl At The Window - Publication History

Publication History

  • 1981, Japan, Kodansha Publishers Ltd., ISBN 4-7700-1010-9, Pub date 1981, Paperback
  • 1984, Japan, Kodansha International, ISBN 0-87011-537-5, Pub date 1984, Paperback

Totto-chan was originally published in Japan as a series of articles in Kodansha's Young Woman magazine appearing from February 1979 through December 1980. The articles were then collected into a book, which made Japanese publishing history by selling more than 5 million before the end of 1982, which made the book break all previous publishing records and become the bestselling book in Japanese history

An English edition, translated by Dorothy Britton, was published in America in 1984. The book has been translated into a number of languages, including Chinese, French, Italian, German, Korean, Malay, Tagalog, Vietnamese, Indonesian, Thai, Russian, Uyghur, Sinhala, and Lao, and many Indian languages including Hindi, Marathi, Gujarati, Telugu, Kannada, Assamese, Kannada, and Malayalam.

A bilingual collection of stories from the book, entitled Best of Totto-chan: Totto Chan: The Little Girl at the Window, was published in 1996.

Read more about this topic:  Totto-Chan: The Little Girl At The Window

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