Toba Station - Lines

Lines

  • JR Central
    • Sangū Line(No.0 to No.2)
  • Kintetsu(No.3 to No.6)
    • Toba Line
    • Shima Line

Read more about this topic:  Toba Station

Other articles related to "lines, line":

Binary Space Partitioning - Generation
... use of this algorithm in converting a list of lines or polygons into a BSP tree ... the eight steps (i.-viii.), the algorithm above is applied to a list of lines, and one new node is added to the tree Start with a list of lines, (or in 3-D, polygons) making up the scene ... In the spatial diagram of the lines, direction chosen to be the 'front' of a line is denoted by an arrow ...
Yamato-Saidaiji Station - Lines
... Kintetsu Nara Line Kyoto Line Kashihara Line Yamato-Saidaiji Station is a junction of the lines from four directions Osaka (Nara Line) from the west, Nara (Nara Line) from the east, Kyoto (Kyoto Line ...
Trafalgar Square - Access
... Charing Cross – Northern and Bakerloo Lines—has an exit in the square ... The two lines originally had separate stations, of which the Bakerloo Line one was called Trafalgar Square they were linked and renamed in 1979 as part of ... – District, Circle, Northern and Bakerloo Lines ...
Cymbeline - Adaptations and Cultural References
... the last of the heavy revisions designed to bring the play in line with Aristotelean unities ... These last two lines appear to have inspired T ... Eliot in "Lines to a Yorkshire Terrier" (in Five-Finger Exercises), he writes Pollicle dogs and cats all must Jellicle cats and dogs all must Like undertakers, come to dust ...
Ode To A Nightingale - Poem
... use of heavy sounding syllables ("My heart aches" line 1), as it introduces the song of a hidden bird ... (lines 5–10) The song encourages the narrator to give up his own sense of self and embrace the feelings that are evoked by the nightingale ... And with thee fade away into the forest dim (lines 11–13, 19–20) The narrator uses metaphorical wings to join the nightingale ...

Famous quotes containing the word lines:

    We joined long wagon trains moving south; we met hundreds of wagons going north; the roads east and west were crawling lines of families traveling under canvas, looking for work, for another foothold somewhere on the land.... The country was ruined, the whole world was ruined; nothing like this had ever happened before. There was no hope, but everyone felt the courage of despair.
    Rose Wilder Lane (1886–1968)

    GOETHE, raised o’er joy and strife,
    Drew the firm lines of Fate and Life,
    And brought Olympian wisdom down
    To court and mar, to gown and town,
    Stooping, his finger wrote in clay
    The open secret of to-day.
    Ralph Waldo Emerson (1803–1882)

    The opera isn’t over till the fat lady sings.
    —Anonymous.

    A modern proverb along the lines of “don’t count your chickens before they’re hatched.” This form of words has no precise origin, though both Bartlett’s Familiar Quotations (16th ed., 1992)