Tissue

Tissue may refer to:

  • Tissue (biology), a group of biological cells that perform a similar function
  • Tissue (moth), the geometer moth, Triphosa dubitata
  • Tissue paper, a type of thin, translucent paper used for wrapping and cushioning items
    • Facial tissue, a type of thin, soft, disposable paper used for nose-blowing
    • Wrapping tissue
    • Japanese tissue
  • Aerial tissue, an acrobatic art form and one of the circus arts

Other articles related to "tissue, tissues":

Blepharoplasty - Procedure
... The anatomy of the eyelids, skin quality, age, and the adjacent tissue all affect the cosmetic and functional outcomes ... A suture holds the inner eyelid tissue over the eye Fat is held with forceps (left) and clamped with a hemostat (right) ... A small retractor (bottom right) keeps away extra tissue The fat is cut away with surgical scissors (right) ...
Explant Culture
... of cells from a piece or pieces of tissue ... Tissue harvested in this manner is called an explant ... the shoot, leaves, or some cells from a plant, or can be any part of the tissue from an animal ...
Biological Tissue - Animal Tissues
... Animal tissues can be grouped into four basic types connective, muscle, nervous, and epithelial ... Multiple tissue types comprise organs and body structures ... all animals can generally be considered to contain the four tissue types, the manifestation of these tissues can differ depending on the type of organism ...
Pancreatic Hormones - In Animals
... Pancreatic tissue is present in all vertebrate species, but its precise form and arrangement vary widely ... (such as rabbits), there is no discrete pancreas at all, with pancreatic tissue being distributed diffusely across the mesentery and even within other nearby organs, such as the liver or spleen ... In a few teleost species, the endocrine tissue has fused to form a distinct gland within the abdominal cavity, but otherwise it is distributed among the exocrine components ...

Famous quotes containing the word tissue:

    Whether or not his newspaper and a set of senses reduced to five are the main sources of the so-called “real life” of the so- called average man, one thing is fortunately certain: namely, that the average man himself is but a piece of fiction, a tissue of statistics.
    Vladimir Nabokov (1899–1977)