Timeline of United States Military Operations

Timeline Of United States Military Operations

This is a timeline of United States government military operations. The list through 1975 is based on Committee on International Relations (now known as the Committee on Foreign Affairs). Dates show the years in which U.S. government military units participated. The bolded items are the U.S. government wars most often considered to be major conflicts by historians and the general public. Note that instances where the U.S. government gave aid alone, with no military personnel involvement, are excluded, as are Central Intelligence Agency operations.

Read more about Timeline Of United States Military Operations:  Battles With The Native Americans, Relocation, Armed Insurrections and Slave Revolts, Range Wars, Bloody Local Feuds, Bloodless Boundary Disputes, Labor-management Disputes, State and National Secession Attempts, Riots and Public Disorder, Miscellaneous

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