Tie

Tie may refer to:

  • Necktie, a long piece of cloth worn around the neck or shoulders
    • Cravat, the forerunner to the modern tie
  • Tie (draw), a finish to a competition with identical results, particularly sports
  • Tie (engineering), a strong component designed to keep two objects closely linked together
  • Tie (information technology), a concept to bind a distributed object to a class
  • Tie (music), a musical notation symbol joining two notes without a break
  • Tie (typography), a punctuation and diacritical sign
  • Railroad tie, a rectangular support for the rail
  • Simpson Tie or Strong-Tie, a connector used in building
  • Interpersonal ties in sociology and psychology.

TIE may refer to:

  • TIE receptors, specific types of cell surface receptors
  • Tensilica Instruction Extension, a verilog like language that is used to describe the instruction extensions to the Xtensa processor core
  • Telx Internet Exchange
  • Times Interest Earned, a financial ratio
  • Transport Initiatives Edinburgh Ltd., an Edinburgh based public transport company
  • Titanium Metals Corporation, based on its stock symbol on the New York Stock Exchange
  • TIE fighter, a fictional spacecraft in the Star Wars universe

TiE may refer to

  • TiE (The Indus Entrepreneurs)

Famous quotes containing the word tie:

    Go tie back your hair, said my mother,
    and Why is your mouth all green?
    Rob Roy, he pulled some clover
    as we crossed the field, I told her.
    May Swenson (1919–1995)

    Don’t tie your shoes in a melon patch, and don’t adjust your hat under a plum tree.
    Chinese proverb.

    If you tie a horse to a stake, do you expect he will grow fat? If you pen an Indian up on a small spot of earth, and compel him to stay there, he will not be contented, nor will he grow and prosper. I have asked some of the great white chiefs where they get their authority to say to the Indian that he shall stay in one place, while he sees white men going where they please. They can not tell me.
    Chief Joseph (c. 1840–1904)