Thomas Galt - Biography

Biography

Thomas Galt was born in Lancaster County, Pennsylvania. He graduated from Jefferson College in Canonsburg, Pennsylvania and later attended Presbyterian Theological Seminary in Allegheny City, Pennsylvania. Although licensed by the Presbytery of Ohio on June 18, 1834, he was ordained and installed as pastor at Farmington Presbyterian Church in Farmington, Illinois in early 1836.

In 1837 Galt answered the call by Elijah Lovejoy (American abolitionist and newspaper publisher) to attend the Anti-Slavery Convention in Upper Alton, Illinois. At the convention, Galt, Edward Beecher (brother of Harriet Beecher Stowe) and other attendees countered attempts by Illinois Attorney General Usher Linder to derail the proceedings.


The Anti-Slavery Convention ended sine die (without further plans) on October 28, 1837; however, the convention attendees reconvened the same day to form the Illinois Anti-Slavery Society. Galt was elected Vice-President.

As a "new school" Presbyterian, Galt favored an early end of slavery. Owing to "old school" sentiment in the Farmington church, he moved on in April 1842 to form Center Presbyterian Church in Farmington, Illinois. He held meetings of the Sangamon County Anti-Slavery Society at Center Presbyterian Church.

On February 7, 1849, Galt organized another “new school” church, the Third Presbyterian Church in Springfield, Illinois.

Galt was reportedly a Sangamon County “conductor” of the Underground Railroad.

Galt died on September, 12th 1857.

Read more about this topic:  Thomas Galt

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