Thiophene - Properties

Properties

At room temperature, thiophene is a colorless liquid with a mildly pleasant odor reminiscent of benzene, with which thiophene shares some similarities. The high reactivity of thiophene toward sulfonation is the basis for the separation of thiophene from benzene, which are difficult to separate by distillation due to their similar boiling points (4 °C difference at ambient pressure). Like benzene, thiophene forms an azeotrope with ethanol.

The molecule is flat; the bond angle at the sulphur is around 93 degrees, the C-C-S angle is around 109, and the other two carbons have a bond angle around 114 degrees. The C-C bonds to the carbons adjacent to the sulphur are about 1.34A, the C-S bond length is around 1.70A, and the other C-C bond is about 1.41A (figures from the Cambridge Structural Database).

Read more about this topic:  Thiophene

Other articles related to "properties":

Geophysics - Physical Phenomena - Mineral Physics
... Further information Mineral physics The physical properties of minerals must be understood to infer the composition of the Earth's interior from seismology, the geothermal ... Mineral physicists study the elastic properties of minerals their high-pressure phase diagrams, melting points and equations of state at high pressure and the ... Water is a very complex substance and its unique properties are essential for life ...
Zamak 4
0.05 0.003 0.002 0.001 0.02 0.001 0.02 0.0005 0.001 Zamak 4 properties Property Metric value English value Mechanical properties Ultimate tensile strength 317 MPa 46,000 psi Yield strength (0.2 ...

Famous quotes containing the word properties:

    A drop of water has the properties of the sea, but cannot exhibit a storm. There is beauty of a concert, as well as of a flute; strength of a host, as well as of a hero.
    Ralph Waldo Emerson (1803–1882)

    The reason why men enter into society, is the preservation of their property; and the end why they choose and authorize a legislative, is, that there may be laws made, and rules set, as guards and fences to the properties of all the members of the society: to limit the power, and moderate the dominion, of every part and member of the society.
    John Locke (1632–1704)