The Woman of Rome

The Woman Of Rome

The Woman from Rome (Italian: La romana) is a 1947 novel by Alberto Moravia about the intersecting lives of many characters, chief among them being a prostitute (whose mother is also a prostitute) and an idealistic intellectual who, after an interrogation by the Fascist officers, during which he betrays his colleagues (for reasons he himself is not able to understand), becomes completely disillusioned about everything.

Like many other novels by Alberto Moravia novels and by other authors of the time, this novel explores the themes of existentialism and morality and alienation.

Even though the novel is about a prostitute, an intellectual who loses his commitment and his belief in everything, and a Fascist officer, the novel still presents compelling insights about the individual and the society and what links them together. And also about their respective responsibilities.

The novel was adapted into a film in 1954.

Read more about The Woman Of Rome:  Bibliography

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Famous quotes containing the words rome and/or woman:

    What is there in Rome for me to see that others have not seen before me? What is there for me to touch that others have not touched? What is there for me to feel, to learn, to hear, to know, that shall thrill me before it pass to others? What can I discover?—Nothing. Nothing whatsoever. One charm of travel dies here.
    Mark Twain [Samuel Langhorne Clemens] (1835–1910)

    When a woman is very, very bad, she is awful, but when a man is correspondingly good, he is weird.
    Minna Antrim (1861–?)