The Unreasonable Effectiveness of Mathematics in The Natural Sciences

The Unreasonable Effectiveness of Mathematics in the Natural Sciences is the title of an article published in 1960 by the physicist Eugene Wigner. In the paper, Wigner observed that the mathematical structure of a physics theory often points the way to further advances in that theory and even to empirical predictions, and argued that this is not just a coincidence and therefore must reflect some larger and deeper truth about both mathematics and physics.

Read more about The Unreasonable Effectiveness Of Mathematics In The Natural Sciences:  The Miracle of Mathematics in The Natural Sciences, The Deep Connection Between Science and Mathematics, Responses To Wigner's Original Paper, Related Quotes

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The Unreasonable Effectiveness Of Mathematics In The Natural Sciences - Related Quotes
... How can it be that mathematics, being after all a product of human thought which is independent of experience, is so admirably appropriate to the objects of reality?''In my opinion the answer to this ... Albert Einstein There is only one thing which is more unreasonable than the unreasonable effectiveness of mathematics in physics, and this is the unreasonable ineffectiveness ... if nature is really structured with a mathematical language and mathematics invented by man can manage to understand it, this demonstrates something ...

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