The Songs of A Sentimental Bloke - Publication Details

Publication Details

The first portion of the novel, The Stoush O' Day, was originally published in The Bulletin on 1 April 1909. All bar two of the remaining chapters were also published in that magazine between 1909 and 1915.

The completed work was first published in book form in Sydney on 9 October 1915.

Publication details
First Edition Sydney 9 October 1915 2,500 copies
Second impression Sydney 2 November 1915 5,000 copies
Third impression Sydney 6 December 5,000 copies
Fourth impression Sydney 25 January 1916 5,000 copies
Fifth impression Sydney 22 February 1916 7,000 copies
Sixth impression Sydney 1 April 1916 5,500 copies
Seventh impression Sydney 30 May 1916 11,000 copies
Eighth impression Sydney 1 April 1916 5,000 copies
Pocket edition Sydney 25 September 1916 10,000 copies
Tenth impression Sydney 7 October 1916 8,000 copies
Eleventh impression Sydney 24 October 1916 5,000 copies
Twelfth impression Sydney 17 November 1916 5,000 copies
Thirteenth impression Sydney 2 May 1917 5,000 copies
Fourteenth impression London 1 July 1917 5,000 copies
Fifteenth impression Sydney 1 August 1917 5,000 copies
Sixteenth impression London 21 May 1918 5,000 copies
Seventeenth impression Sydney 14 June 1919 3,000 copies
Eighteenth impression Sydney 31 August 1919 3,000 copies
Nineteenth impression Sydney 20 April 1920 3,000 copies
Twentieth impression Sydney 31 August 1920 3,000 copies

Read more about this topic:  The Songs Of A Sentimental Bloke

Famous quotes containing the words details and/or publication:

    If my sons are to become the kind of men our daughters would be pleased to live among, attention to domestic details is critical. The hostilities that arise over housework...are crushing the daughters of my generation....Change takes time, but men’s continued obliviousness to home responsibilities is causing women everywhere to expire of trivialities.
    Mary Kay Blakely (20th century)

    An action is the perfection and publication of thought. A right action seems to fill the eye, and to be related to all nature.
    Ralph Waldo Emerson (1803–1882)