The CBS Late Movie

The CBS Late Movie is a CBS television series (later known as CBS Late Night) from the 1970s and 1980s, that ran in most American television markets from 11:30 p.m. until 2:30 a.m. or later, on weeknights. A single announcer (in the early years, CBS staff announcer Norm Stevens) voiced the introduction and commercial bumpers for each program, but there was no host per se, or closing credits besides those of the night's presentation. (The bumpers announcing the stars of the movie notably rotated names, two or three at a time, so more of the players would be mentioned.)

The theme music was So Old, So Young by Morton Stevens, which also served as the theme music for CBS's prime-time movies until 1978.

A memorable aspect to the show's commercial breaks was the frequent appearance of public service announcements, from the Ad Council and other organizations, that often dealt with "mature" topics such as venereal disease, sexual and violent crimes, and abuse of hard drugs. Announcements also ran in much greater proportion than during prime time, with commercial breaks lasting longer; it was not uncommon for the second portion of the show to start at 12:05AM or 12:40AM.

Other articles related to "the cbs late movie, cbs":

The CBS Late Movie - History - 1989–1993
... In 1989, CBS Late Night was replaced by The Pat Sajak Show ... A year later, CBS Late Night returned after The Pat Sajak Show was shortened from 90 minutes to 60 minutes in February 1990 ... CBS continued to show reruns of their primetime shows like Wiseguy and other networks' shows, including FOX's 21 Jump Street and NBC's Stingray ...

Famous quotes containing the words movie and/or late:

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