The Book of Salt - Characters - Gertrude Stein

Gertrude Stein

Truong creates a creative depiction of Gertrude Stein's private life during her time in Paris. She is depicted as a private, but exuberant woman who delights in her weekly private salons and the attention she receives from them. Gertrude Stein abstains from the routines of domestic life, preferring to focus on her writing or inspiration for it and leaving the management of 27 Rue de Fleurus to her lover, Alice Toklas.

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Other articles related to "gertrude stein, steins, stein":

Grammy Award For Best Spoken Word Album - 1980s
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Gertrude Stein - Related Exhibits
... The Steins Collect Matisse, Picasso, and the Parisian Avant-Garde, The Metropolitan Museum of Art of New-York, February 28 – June 3, 2012 ... The Steins Collect Matisse, Picasso, and the Parisian Avant-Garde, San Francisco Museum of Modern Art, May 21, 2011 – September 6, 2011, http//www.sfmoma.or ... Seeing Gertrude Stein five stories, Washington, D.C ...
The Book Of Salt - Themes and Motifs - Photographs
... Later in the novel, Binh admires a photo of Gertrude Stein donning a kimono ... He finds this photo hidden away in the cabinet where Gertrude Stein keeps her writing journals ... if Binh promises to give Sweet Sunday Man a copy of Gertrude Stein’s work ...
Henri Matisse - Gertrude Stein, Académie Matisse, and The Cone Sisters
... Picasso were first brought together at the Paris salon of Gertrude Stein and her companion Alice B ... the 20th century, Americans in Paris— Gertrude Stein, her brothers Leo Stein, Michael Stein and Michael's wife Sarah—were important collectors and supporters of Matisse's ... In addition Gertrude Stein's two American friends from Baltimore, the Cone sisters Claribel and Etta, became major patrons of Matisse and Picasso, collecting hundreds of their paintings ...
Samuel Steward - Life and Career
... Steward gained an introduction to Gertrude Stein in 1932 through his academic advisor Clarence Andrews, and so began a long correspondence with Stein which resulted in a warm friendship ... He also described his friendship with Stein and Toklas in his Dear Sammy Letters from Gertrude Stein and Alice B ... After Gertrude Stein, Kinsey was Steward’s most important mentor he later described Kinsey not only "as approachable as a park bench" but also as a god-like bringer of ...

Famous quotes by gertrude stein:

    A long war like this makes you realise the society you really prefer, the home, goats chickens and dogs and casual acquaintances. I find myself not caring at all for gardens flowers or vegetables cats cows and rabbits, one gets tired of trees vines and hills, but houses, goats chickens dogs and casual acquaintances never pall.
    Gertrude Stein (1874–1946)

    The only ones who are really grateful for the war are the wild ducks, such a lot of them in the marshes of the Rhone and so peaceful ... because all the shot-guns have been taken away completely taken away and nobody can shoot with them nobody at all and the wild ducks are very content. They act as of they had never been shot at, never, it is so easy to form old habits again, so very easy.
    Gertrude Stein (1874–1946)

    A writer must always try to have a philosophy and he should also have a psychology and a philology and many other things. Without a philosophy and a psychology and all these various other things he is not really worthy of being called a writer. I agree with Kant and Schopenhauer and Plato and Spinoza and that is quite enough to be called a philosophy. But then of course a philosophy is not the same thing as a style.
    Gertrude Stein (1874–1946)

    Nature is commonplace. Imitation is more interesting.
    Gertrude Stein (1874–1946)

    The minute you or anybody else knows what you are you are not it, you are what you or anybody else knows you are and as everything in living is made up of finding out what you are it is extraordinarily difficult really not to know what you are and yet to be that thing.
    Gertrude Stein (1874–1946)