The American Poetry Review

The American Poetry Review (APR) is an American poetry magazine printed every other month on tabloid-sized newsprint.

Founded in 1972 by Stephen Berg, APR has always been published from editorial offices in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. Berg is one of three editors, along with David Bonanno and Elizabeth Scanlon.

According to the magazine's Web site, it has a circulation of 17,000. It publishes contemporary poetry and prose from a diverse array of authors.

Read more about The American Poetry Review:  History, See Also

Other articles related to "poetry":

Poetry - Genres
... In addition to specific forms of poems, poetry is often thought of in terms of different genres and subgenres ... A poetic genre is generally a tradition or classification of poetry based on the subject matter, style, or other broader literary characteristics ... Narrative poetry Narrative poetry is a genre of poetry that tells a story ...
Emblems of The Muses
... Muse Domain Emblem Calliope Epic poetry Writing tablet Clio History Scrolls Erato Love poetry Cithara (an ancient Greek musical instrument in the lyre family) Euterpe Song and Elegiac poetry ... Calliope (epic poetry) carries a writing tablet Clio (history) carries a scroll and books Erato (love/erotic poetry) is often seen with a lyre and a crown of roses Euterpe (lyric poetry) carries a flute ...
Yuriy Tarnawsky - Selected Bibliography
... Life in the City (1956, poetry, Ukrainian) Popoludni v Pokipsi (Afternoons in Poughkeepsie) (1960, poetry, Ukrainian, New York Group Publishing) Shljaxy (Roads) (1961, novel, Ukrainian, Suchasnist ... plays, Ukrainian, Rodovid) An Ideal Woman (1999, poetry, Ukrainian) The City of Sticks and Pits (1999, book-length poem, Ukrainian) Jix nemaje (They Don't Exist) (1999, collected poetry 1970–1999 ...

Famous quotes containing the words review, american and/or poetry:

    Twice and thrice over, as they say, good is it to repeat and review what is good.
    Plato (c. 427–347 B.C.)

    There is a constant in the average American imagination and taste, for which the past must be preserved and celebrated in full-scale authentic copy; a philosophy of immortality as duplication. It dominates the relation with the self, with the past, not infrequently with the present, always with History and, even, with the European tradition.
    Umberto Eco (b. 1932)

    The author’s conviction on this day of New Year is that music begins to atrophy when it departs too far from the dance; that poetry begins to atrophy when it gets too far from music; but this must not be taken as implying that all good music is dance music or all poetry lyric. Bach and Mozart are never too far from physical movement.
    Ezra Pound (1885–1972)