Thames Head

Thames Head is a site in Gloucestershire, traditionally identified as the source of the River Thames, a major river which runs through the centre of London. It lies near the village of Kemble and the town of Cirencester.

The claim that Thames Head is the source of the River Thames is disputed. The Environment Agency, the Ordnance Survey and other authorities have the source of the Thames as the nearby Trewsbury Mead. Others hold that the true source of the Thames is at Seven Springs, Gloucestershire, some eleven miles further north, and east of Gloucester. Officially, however, Seven Springs is the source of the River Churn, a tributary of the Thames that joins at Cricklade. Some would say that this tributary, by its distance, in rising further than Trewsbury Mead, would therefore result in the Seven Springs being the ultimate source of the Thames.

Read more about Thames HeadMonument

Other articles related to "thames, thames head":

Thames And Severn Canal - History - Operation
... springs at Boxwell and a well near the source of the River Thames at Thames Head, would be sufficient ... The original horse pump at Thames Head was replaced by a windmill, but Clowes discovered that he could not stop the summit pound from leaking ... The wells at Thames Head were extended and a Boulton Watt steam engine was installed in 1792 to pump the water into the canal ...
Thames Head - Monument
... THE CONSERVATORS OF THE RIVER THAMES 1857-1974 THIS STONE WAS PLACED HERE TO MARK THE SOURCE OF THE RIVER THAMES ...

Famous quotes containing the words head and/or thames:

    The most advanced nations are always those who navigate the most. The power which the sea requires in the sailor makes a man of him very fast, and the change of shores and population clears his head of much nonsense of his wigwam.
    Ralph Waldo Emerson (1803–1882)

    The wind’s on the wold
    And the night is a-cold,
    And Thames runs chill
    ‘Twixt mead and hill.
    But kind and dear
    Is the old house here
    And my heart is warm
    Midst winter’s harm.
    William Morris (1834–1896)