Tend

Tend may refer to:

  • Attend (attention)
  • Bartend, to serve beverages behind a bar
  • Tend and befriend, a behavioural pattern exhibited by human beings and some animal species when under threat

Read more about TendSee Also

Other articles related to "tend":

My Sims Racing - Game Features - Base Vehicle Types
... against a bumping opponent they will tend to get pushed around a little more on the tracks ... The obvious differences are that these vehicles are very heavy and tend to bully opponents off the tracks ... Their downsides are they tend to accelerate very slow and do not handle as well as the compact karts ...
Cocktail Garnish
... especially those with fruit flavors, tend to be decorated with tropical-themed garnishes or slices of fruit ... Gin- and vodka-based drinks tend toward garnishes with a more dignified flair (olives, onions, or possibly a citrus twist or a single maraschino cherry), unless they are variations of a fruity rum-based ... Whiskey- and brandy-based drinks tend toward minimal garnishment, if any ...
Tend And Befriend
... Tend and befriend is a behavior exhibited by some animals, including humans, when under threat ... The tend-and-befriend idea was originally developed by Dr ...
Tend - See Also - Other
... Buddhism Tendarba, moth genus Tendance, 2001 music album by Amanda Lear Tendō (disambiguation) Tendon (disambiguation) Tendril, in botany Tendu (disambiguation ...
Biarum
... Their corms are spherical and the plants as a whole tend to be small ... Their inflorescence tend to grow close to the ground and produce an extremely intense and unpleasant odor ... The fruits produced tend to be camouflaged so as to resemble stones ...

Famous quotes containing the word tend:

    Soft men tend to be born from soft countries.
    Herodotus (c. 484–424 B.C.)

    Our achievements speak for themselves. What we have to keep track of are our failures, discouragements, and doubts. We tend to forget the past difficulties, the many false starts, and the painful groping. We see our past achievements as the end result of a clean forward thrust, and our present difficulties as signs of decline and decay.
    Eric Hoffer (1902–1983)

    Truth is that concordance of an abstract statement with the ideal limit towards which endless investigation would tend to bring scientific belief, which concordance the abstract statement may possess by virtue of the confession of its inaccuracy and one-sidedness, and this confession is an essential ingredient of truth.
    Charles Sanders Peirce (1839–1914)