Tax Protester History in The United States

Tax Protester History In The United States

A tax protester, in the United States, is a person who denies that he or she owes a tax based on the belief that the constitution, statutes, or regulations do not empower the government to impose, assess or collect the tax. The tax protester may have no dispute with how the government spends its revenue. This differentiates a tax protester from a tax resister, who seeks to avoid paying a tax because the tax is being used for purposes with which the resister takes issue.

Read more about Tax Protester History In The United States:  Origin of American Tax Protesters, The Modern Tax Protester Movement, Prohibition On IRS Use of The Designation, Old Arguments and New, Notable Tax Protesters

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Tax Protester History In The United States - Notable Tax Protesters - Andrew Joseph Stack III
... Andrew Joseph Stack III was a computer programmer who on February 18, 2010 set fire to his own house, drove to a local airport, then flew a Piper Dakota into a local IRS field office in Austin Texas ... Stack and an IRS employee were killed and 13 people were injured ...

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