Syllable Coda - Stress

Stress

Syllable structure often interacts with stress. In Latin, for example, stress is regularly determined by syllable weight, a syllable counting as heavy if it has at least one of the following:

  • a long vowel in its nucleus
  • a diphthong in its nucleus
  • one or more coda(e)

In each case the syllable is considered to have two moras.

Read more about this topic:  Syllable Coda

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Famous quotes containing the word stress:

    In the stress of modern life, how little room is left for that most comfortable vanity that whispers in our ears that failures are not faults! Now we are taught from infancy that we must rise or fall upon our own merits; that vigilance wins success, and incapacity means ruin.
    Agnes Repplier (1858–1950)

    Anyone who wishes to combine domestic responsibilities and paid employment with the least stress and most enjoyment might start by pondering this paradox: the first step to better functioning is to stop blaming herself for not functioning well enough.
    Faye J. Crosby (20th century)

    While ... we cannot and must not hide our concern for grave world dangers, and while, at the same time, we cannot build walls around ourselves and hide our heads in the sand, we must go forward with all our strength to stress and to strive for international peace. In this effort America must and will protect herself.
    Franklin D. Roosevelt (1882–1945)