Sycamore Shoals State Historic Area

Sycamore Shoals State Historic Area is a state park located in Elizabethton, in the U.S. state of Tennessee. The park consists of 70 acres (28.3 ha) situated along the Sycamore Shoals of the Watauga River, a National Historic Landmark where a series of events critical to the establishment of the states of Tennessee and Kentucky, and the settlement of the Trans-Appalachian frontier in general, took place. Along with the historic shoals, the park includes a visitor center and museum, the reconstructed Fort Watauga, and the Carter Mansion (at a satellite location in Elizabethton).

For over a thousand years before the arrival of European explorers, Sycamore Shoals and adjacent lands had been inhabited by Native Americans. The first permanent European settlers arrived in 1770, and established the Watauga Association— one of the first written constitutional governments west of the Appalachian Mountains— in 1772. Richard Henderson and Daniel Boone negotiated the Treaty of Sycamore Shoals in 1775, which saw the sale of millions of acres of Cherokee lands in Kentucky and Tennessee and led to the building of the Wilderness Road. During the American Revolution, Sycamore Shoals was both the site of Fort Watauga, where part of a Cherokee invasion was thwarted in 1776, and the mustering ground for the Overmountain Men in 1780.

Read more about Sycamore Shoals State Historic Area:  The Carter Mansion, Annual Events

Other articles related to "sycamore shoals state historic area, shoals":

Sycamore Shoals State Historic Area - Annual Events
... and Living History Weekends, January–December Sunday Jams at the Carter Mansion and the Shoals, January–October Mountain River Concerts, January–Octob ...

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