Svalbard

Svalbard is an archipelago in the Arctic, constituting the northernmost part of Norway. It is located about 400 miles north of mainland Europe, midway between mainland Norway and the North Pole. The group of islands range from 74° to 81° north latitude (inside the Arctic Circle), and from 10° to 35° east longitude. Spitsbergen is the largest island, followed by Nordaustlandet and Edgeøya. The administrative center is Longyearbyen, and other settlements include the active Russian mining community of Barentsburg, the abandoned Russian mining settlement of Pyramiden (which was founded by the Swedish), the research community of Ny-Ålesund, and the Swedish mining outpost of Sveagruva. The archipelago is administered by the Governor of Svalbard, whose authority is granted by the Norwegian government.

The islands were first used as a whaling base in the 17th and 18th centuries. Several species of whales were hunted to near-extinction and whaling eventually ceased. Coal mining began in the early 1900s, and several permanent communities were established. The Svalbard Treaty of 1920 recognizes Norwegian sovereignty, and the 1925 Svalbard Act made Svalbard a full part of the Kingdom of Norway. This act also established Svalbard as a free economic zone and a demilitarized zone. The Norwegian Store Norske and the Russian Arktikugol are the only mining companies remaining on the islands. Research and tourism have become important supplementary industries. Two major research facilities are the University Centre in Svalbard and the Svalbard Global Seed Vault. No roads connect the settlements; instead snowmobiles, aircraft and boats serve inter-community transport. Svalbard Airport, Longyear serves as the main gateway to the rest of Europe.

The archipelago features an Arctic climate, although with significantly higher temperatures than other areas at the same latitude. The flora take advantage of the long period of midnight sun to compensate for the polar night. Svalbard is a breeding ground for many seabirds, and also features polar bears, reindeer and marine mammals. Seven national parks and twenty-three nature reserves cover two-thirds of the archipelago, protecting the largely untouched, yet fragile, environment. Sixty percent of the archipelago is glacier, and the islands feature many mountains and fjords.

Read more about Svalbard:  Geography, History, Population, Politics, Economy, Transport, Climate, Nature

Other articles related to "svalbard":

1925 In Norway - Events
17 July - the Parliament of Norway passed the Svalbard Act (Norwegian Lov om Svalbard or colloquially Svalbardloven) which established Norwegian sovereignty on the island of Svalbard, and stated that ...
Politics Of Svalbard
... Svalbard lies under the sovereignty of Norway, but the Svalbard Treaty places several restrictions ... Public administration of the archipelago is the responsibility of the Governor of Svalbard, who acts as county governor and chief of police ... The institution was established by and is regulated by the Svalbard Act, which also limits which Norwegian laws apply to the islands ...
Locations In His Dark Materials - Locations - Svalbard
... Svalbard is the location of the panserbjørne palace and the center of the ice bear government ... Unlike most locations in the story, Svalbard is an actual location ...
Morten Ruud
... he was a deputy judge, and the years 1998 to 2001 when he was the Governor of Svalbard ... While serving in Svalbard, Ruud and his Deputy Governor Rune Bård Hansen expelled three young men from Svalbard, invoking—for the first time in history—a 1976 ...
Svalbard - Nature
... four primarily terrestrial mammalian species inhabit the archipelago the Arctic Fox, the Svalbard reindeer, polar bears and accidentally introduced Southern Vole—which is only found in Grumant ... Polar bears are the iconic symbol of Svalbard, and one of the main tourist attractions ... Svalbard and Franz Joseph Land share a common population of 3,000 polar bears, with Kong Karls Land being the most important breeding ground ...