Survival Skills

Survival skills are techniques a person may use in a dangerous situation (e.g. natural disasters) to save themselves or others. These techniques are meant to provide basic necessities for human life: water, food, shelter, habitat, the ability to think straight, to signal for help, to navigate safely, to avoid unpleasant interactions with animals and plants, and cure any present injuries. Survival skills are often basic ideas and abilities that ancient humans have used for thousands of years. Hiking, backpacking, horseback riding, fishing, hunting and many other outdoor activities all require basic wilderness survival skills to handle an emergency situation. Bushcraft and primitive living are most often self-implemented, but require many of the same skills.

Read more about Survival SkillsFirst Aid, Shelter, Water, Food, Navigation, Mental Preparedness, Important Survival Items, Survival Manuals, Common Myths

Other articles related to "survival skills, survival":

Reintroduction - Survival Skills
... Survival techniques, which are normally passed from parents to offspring during parenting, are lost ... be planned carefully, ensuring that the animals have the necessary survival skills ...
Survival Skills - Common Myths
... Some survival books promote the "Universal Edibility Test" ... Allegedly, it is possible to distinguish edible foods from toxic ones by a series of progressive exposures to skin and mouth prior to ingestion, with waiting periods and checks for symptoms ...

Famous quotes containing the words skills and/or survival:

    Many women are reluctant to allow men to enter their domain. They don’t want men to acquire skills in what has traditionally been their area of competence and one of their main sources of self-esteem. So while they complain about the male’s unwillingness to share in domestic duties, they continually push the male out when he moves too confidently into what has previously been their exclusive world.
    Bettina Arndt (20th century)

    We never stop investigating. We are never satisfied that we know enough to get by. Every question we answer leads on to another question. This has become the greatest survival trick of our species.
    Desmond Morris (b. 1928)