Station Wagons

Station Wagons

A station wagon, also called an estate car and an estate, is an automotive body-style variant of a sedan/saloon with its roof extended rearward over a shared passenger/cargo volume with access at the back via a third or fifth door (the liftgate or tailgate), instead of a trunk lid. The body style transforms a standard three-box design into a two-box design — to include an A, B, and C-pillar, as well as a D-pillar. Station wagons can flexibly reconfigure their interior volume via fold-down rear seats to prioritize either passenger or cargo volume.

The American Heritage Dictionary defines a station wagon as "an automobile with one or more rows of folding or removable seats behind the driver and no luggage compartment but an area behind the seats into which suitcases, parcels, etc., can be loaded through a tailgate."

When a model range includes multiple body styles, such as sedan, hatchback and station wagon, the models typically share their platform, drivetrain and bodywork forward of the A-pillar. In 1969, Popular Mechanics said, "Station wagon-style ... follows that of the production sedan of which it is the counterpart. Most are on the same wheelbase, offer the same transmission and engine options, and the same comfort and convenience options."

Station wagons have evolved from their early use as specialized vehicles to carry people and luggage to and from a train station, and have been marketed worldwide.

Read more about Station WagonsName, History, Declining Popularity in North America, Station Wagons Around The World, Tailgate Evolution, Safety Equipment

Other articles related to "station wagons, station wagon, wagons":

List Of Automobile Sales By Model - G
... four marques not counting 1966 full-size Chevrolet station wagons (Production of 1966 full-size Chevrolet station wagons is unknown but a good guess is about 150,000) ... Approximately 6,010,000 across four marques not counting full-size station wagons and 1973 Chevrolets. 1973 full-size Chevrolets is unknown but a good guess is about 800,000 excluding station wagons.) GM B platform 1977–90 Approximately 8,960,000 across ...
Station Wagons - Safety Equipment
... Some station wagons are fitted with additional front-facing or rear-facing seats, along with safety belts, to enable passengers to be carried safely in the cargo area ...
Land Rover Series - Series I
... In 1949, Land Rover launched a second body option called the "Station Wagon", fitted with a body built by Tickford, a coachbuilder known for their work with Rolls-Royc ... five-door model, on the 107-inch chassis known as the "Station Wagon" with seating for up to ten people ... The new station wagons were very different from the previous Tickford model, being built with simple metal panels and bolt-together construction instead of the ...
Sport Wagon - Station Wagons Around The World
... European manufacturers often built two-door station wagons in the post-war period for the compact class, and not four-door models, a practice that continued at Ford (amon ... As in North America, early station wagons were aftermarket conversions and had their new bodywork built with a wooden frame, sometimes with wooden panels, sometimes steel ... Station wagons were the originators of fold down seats to accommodate passengers or cargo In the United Kingdom, station wagons are generally called ...
Sport Wagon - History - Full-size Wagons
... Traditionally, full-sized American station wagons were configured for six or nine passengers ... Through 1956, all wagons had the third row facing forward, but Chrysler's 1957 models had a roof too low to permit a forward-facing seat installed over the ... GM wagons would adopt the rear-facing third row with 1959 models until 1971, and again in 1977 ...

Famous quotes containing the words wagons and/or station:

    We joined long wagon trains moving south; we met hundreds of wagons going north; the roads east and west were crawling lines of families traveling under canvas, looking for work, for another foothold somewhere on the land.... The country was ruined, the whole world was ruined; nothing like this had ever happened before. There was no hope, but everyone felt the courage of despair.
    Rose Wilder Lane (1886–1968)

    If you have any information or evidence regarding the O.J. Simpson case, press 2 now. If you are an expert in fields relating to the O.J. Simpson case and would like to offer your services, press 3 now. If you would like the address where you can send a letter of support to O.J. Simpson, press 1 now. If you are seeking legal representation from the law offices of Robert L. Shapiro, press 4 now.
    Advertisement. Aired August 8, 1994 by Tom Snyder on TV station CNBC. Chicago Sun Times, p. 11 (July 24, 1994)