State University of New York At Oneonta

State University Of New York At Oneonta

The State University of New York College at Oneonta (more commonly known as SUNY Oneonta, and also called Oneonta State and O-State) is a four-year liberal arts college in Oneonta, New York, United States, with approximately 5,900 students. The college offers a wide variety of bachelor's degree programs and a number of graduate degrees. Many academic programs at SUNY Oneonta hold additional national accreditations, including those in Business Economics, Education, Music Industry, Human Ecology, Dietetics and Chemistry. SUNY Oneonta was ranked No. 41 on the 2012 U.S. News and World Report list of “Best Colleges” in the North; named to the Kiplinger’s Personal Finance magazine list of "100 Best Values in Public Colleges” for six years running; and included on the President’s Higher Education Community Service Honor Roll every year since its inception in 2006. In 2011, the Carnegie Foundation for the Advancement of Teaching conferred upon SUNY Oneonta its Community Engagement Classification “in recognition of the college’s civic partnerships and successful efforts to integrate service activities into its curriculum."

Read more about State University Of New York At Oneonta:  History, Mission, Residential Living, Athletics, Notable Alumni, Notable Faculty

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