Star Trek: The Original Series - Production

Production

The show's production staff included art director Matt Jefferies. Jefferies designed the starship Enterprise and most of its interiors. His contributions to the series were honored in the name of the "Jefferies tube", an equipment shaft depicted in various Star Trek series. In addition to working with his brother, John Jefferies, to create the hand-held phaser weapons of Star Trek, Jefferies also developed the set design for the bridge of the Enterprise (which was based on an earlier design by Pato Guzman). Jefferies used his practical experience as an airman during World War II and his knowledge of aircraft design to devise a sleek, functional, ergonomic bridge layout.

The costume designer for Star Trek, Bill Theiss, created the striking look of the Starfleet uniforms for the Enterprise, the costumes for female guest stars, and for various aliens, including the Klingons, Vulcans, Romulans, Tellarites, Andorians, Gideonites and many others.

Artist and sculptor Wah Chang, who had worked for Walt Disney Productions, was hired to design and manufacture props: he created the flip-open communicator, often credited as having influenced the configuration of the portable version of the cellular telephone. Chang also designed the portable sensing-recording-computing "tricorder" device, and various fictitious devices for the starship's engineering crew and its sick bay. Later into the series, he helped to create various memorable aliens, such as the Gorn and the Horta.

Read more about this topic:  Star Trek: The Original Series

Other articles related to "production":

Kaman SH-2 Seasprite - Design and Development - Origins
... Kaman was awarded a contract for four prototype and 12 production HU2K-1 helicopters in late 1957 ... With no follow-on orders, Kaman ended production in the late 1960s after delivering 184 SH-2s to the US Navy although production would be later ... A significant factor in the reopening of the production line was that the Navy's Sikorsky SH-60 Sea Hawk, which was newer and more capable in anti-submarine operations, was too large to ...
Gross Domestic Product - Determining GDP - Expenditure Approach
... measuring the total expenditure of money used to buy things is a way of measuring production ... Note that if you knit yourself a sweater, it is production but does not get counted as GDP because it is never sold ... major activities such as child-rearing (generally unpaid) as production, GDP ceases to be an accurate indicator of production ...
Terminology - Design and Production
... The relationship between design and production is one of planning and executing ... In contrast, production involves a routine or pre-planned process ... A design may also be a mere plan that does not include a production or engineering process, although a working knowledge of such processes is usually expected of designers ...

Famous quotes containing the word production:

    An art whose limits depend on a moving image, mass audience, and industrial production is bound to differ from an art whose limits depend on language, a limited audience, and individual creation. In short, the filmed novel, in spite of certain resemblances, will inevitably become a different artistic entity from the novel on which it is based.
    George Bluestone, U.S. educator, critic. “The Limits of the Novel and the Limits of the Film,” Novels Into Film, Johns Hopkins Press (1957)

    ... this dream that men shall cease to waste strength in competition and shall come to pool their powers of production is coming to pass all over the earth.
    Jane Addams (1860–1935)

    It is part of the educator’s responsibility to see equally to two things: First, that the problem grows out of the conditions of the experience being had in the present, and that it is within the range of the capacity of students; and, secondly, that it is such that it arouses in the learner an active quest for information and for production of new ideas. The new facts and new ideas thus obtained become the ground for further experiences in which new problems are presented.
    John Dewey (1859–1952)