St Peter, Westcheap - Destruction

Destruction

Along with the majority of the churches in the City, St Peter's was destroyed by the Great Fire in 1666. A Rebuilding Act was passed in 1670 and a committee set up under Sir Christopher Wren. It decided to rebuild 51 of the parish churches, but St Peter's was not amongst them. Instead the parish was united with that of St Matthew Friday Street.

The site of the church was retained as a graveyard, and turned into a public garden in the nineteenth century. Three gravestones survive, as do the railings, which date from 1712.

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Famous quotes containing the word destruction:

    Though castles topple on their warder’s heads,
    Though palaces and pyramids do slope
    Their heads to their foundations; though the treasure
    Of nature’s germens tumble all together,
    Even till destruction sicken—answer me
    To what I ask you.
    William Shakespeare (1564–1616)

    The true gardener then brushes over the ground with slow and gentle hand, to liberate a space for breath round some favourite; but he is not thinking about destruction except incidentally. It is only the amateur like myself who becomes obsessed and rejoices with a sadistic pleasure in weeds that are big and bad enough to pull, and at last, almost forgetting the flowers altogether, turns into a Reformer.
    Freya Stark (1893–1993)

    We may be witnesses to a Biblical prophecy come true. “And there shall be destruction and darkness come upon creation, and the beasts shall reign over the earth.”
    —Ted Sherdeman. Gordon Douglas. Dr. Medford (Edmund Gwenn)