Sport in England - Student Sport

Student Sport

Apart from a couple of Oxbridge events, student sport has a very low profile in England. While universities have significant sports facilities, there is no system of sports scholarships. However, students who are elite standard competitors are eligible for funding from bodies such as UK Sport on the same basis as anyone else. The university most focused on sports provision is probably Loughborough University. Budding professionals in the traditionally working class team sports of football and rugby league rarely go to university. Talented youngsters in the more middle class sports of cricket and rugby union are far more likely to attend university, but their sports clubs usually play a greater role in developing their talent than their university coaches. Some sports are attempting to adapt to new conditions in which a far higher proportion of English teenagers attend university than in the past, notably cricket, which has established several university centres of excellence.

Read more about this topic:  Sport In England

Other articles related to "student sport, sports, students":

University Of Edinburgh - Student Life - Student Sport
... Edinburgh University's student sport consists of 67 clubs from the traditional football and rugby to the more unconventional korfball or gliding ... Run by the Edinburgh University Sports Union, these 67 clubs have seen Edinburgh rise to 4th place in the British Universities' Sports Association (BUSA) rankings in 2006-07 and have been in the British ... the 2008 Summer Olympics in Beijing, the University of Edinburgh alumni and students secured four medals - three gold and a silver ...

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