Spiral - As A Symbol

As A Symbol

The spiral plays a specific role in symbolism, and appears in megalithic art, notably in the Newgrange tomb or in many Galician petroglyphs such as the one in Mogor. See, for example, the triple spiral.

While scholars are still debating the subject, there is a growing acceptance that the simple spiral, when found in Chinese art, is an early symbol for the sun. Roof tiles dating back to the Tang Dynasty with this symbol have been found west of the ancient city of Chang'an (modern-day Xian).

Spirals are also a symbol of hypnosis, stemming from the cliché of people and cartoon characters being hypnotized by staring into a spinning spiral (one example being Kaa in Disney's The Jungle Book). They are also used as a symbol of dizziness, where the eyes of a cartoon character, especially in anime and manga, will turn into spirals to show they are dizzy or dazed. The spiral is also found in structures as small as the double helix of DNA and as large as a galaxy. Because of this frequent natural occurrence, the spiral is the official symbol of the World Pantheist Movement.

The spiral is also a symbol of the process of dialectic.

Read more about this topic:  Spiral

Other articles related to "as a symbol, symbols, as a":

Compass (drafting) - As A Symbol
... A compass is often used as a symbol of precision and discernment ... As such it finds a place in logos and symbols such as the Freemasons' Square and Compasses and in various computer icons ... John Donne uses the compass as a conceit in "A Valediction Forbidding Mourning" (1611) ...

Famous quotes containing the word symbol:

    The symbol of perpetual youth, the grass-blade, like a long green ribbon, streams from the sod into the summer, checked indeed by the frost, but anon pushing on again, lifting its spear of last year’s hay with the fresh life below. It grows as steadily as the rill oozes out of the ground.... So our human life but dies down to its root, and still puts forth its green blade to eternity.
    Henry David Thoreau (1817–1862)