Snowy River Cave

Snowy River Cave is a cave passage within Fort Stanton Cave in Lincoln County, New Mexico, obtaining its name from a stream bed of white calcite.

Read more about Snowy River CaveGeology, Hydrology, Biology

Other articles related to "river, snowy river cave, cave":

3M - Environmental Record
... In response to PFC contamination of the Mississippi River and surrounding area, 3M states the area will be "cleaned through a combination of groundwater pump-out wells and soil ... which were released into the nearby Mississippi River ... The search area for PFCs in the Mississippi River now extends to five states, spanning approximately half of the river's total distance ...
Volga River - Nomenclature
... blood vessel" (< *raha-ka), and cognate with Sanskrit rasā́h "liquid, juice mythical river" ... The Turkic peoples living along the river formerly referred to it as Itil or Atil "big river" ... The Turkic peoples associated the Itil's origin with the Kama River ...
Yazoo River
... The Yazoo River is a river in the U.S ... The Yazoo River was named by French explorer La Salle in 1682 as "Rivière des Yazous" in reference to the Yazoo tribe living near the river's mouth ... One long held belief is that it means "river of death" ...
Murray River
... The Murray River (River Murray in South Australia) is Australia's longest river ... before the advent of large scale river regulation, the Mouth has always been comparatively small and shallow ... As of 2010, the Murray River system receives 58% of its natural flow ...
Snowy River Cave - Biology
... From crusts on the cave walls, antibiotic-producing actinobacteria and some 36 strains of manganese-using bacteria have been discovered ...

Famous quotes containing the words cave, snowy and/or river:

    Mankind which began in a cave and behind a windbreak will end in the disease-soaked ruins of a slum.
    —H.G. (Herbert George)

    The splendor falls on castle walls
    And snowy summits old in story;
    The long light shakes across the lakes,
    And the wild cataract leaps in glory.
    Blow, bugle, blow, set the wild echoes flying,
    Blow, bugle; answer, echoes, dying, dying, dying.
    Alfred Tennyson (1809–1892)

    Sitting in that dusky wilderness, under that dark mountain, by the bright river which was full of reflected light, still I heard the wood thrush sing, as if no higher civilization could be attained. By this time the night was upon us.
    Henry David Thoreau (1817–1862)