Slr Cameras

Some articles on slr cameras, camera, slr, cameras, slr camera:

Contaflex SLR
... The Contaflex series is a family of 35mm leaf-shuttered SLR cameras, produced by Zeiss Ikon in the 1950s and 1960s ... The name was first used in 1935 on a 35mm Twin-lens reflex camera, the Contaflex TLR also by ZI ... The Contaflex SLR was introduced in 1953 as one of the first 35mm SLR cameras equipped with a between-the-lens leaf shutter ...
Shutter Speed - Creative Utility in Photography
... Shutter speed is one of several methods used to control the amount of light recorded by the camera's digital sensor or film ... is available for movement in the subject to be recorded by the camera ... in the frame, might be blurred while the rest remains sharp or if the camera is panned to follow a moving subject, the background is blurred while the ...
In Photography - Aperture Control
... Most SLR cameras provide automatic aperture control, which allows viewing and metering at the lens’s maximum aperture, stops the lens down to the working aperture during exposure ... The first SLR cameras with internal (“through-the-lens” or “TTL”) meters (e.g ... coupling between the lens and the camera body, indicating the working aperture to the camera while allowing the lens to be at its maximum aperture for ...
Pellicle Mirror - In Photography
... the pellicle mirror has been employed in single-lens reflex (SLR) cameras, at first to enable through-the-lens exposure measurement and possibly to reduce camera shake ... The conventional SLR camera has a reflex mirror directing the light beam from the lens to the focusing screen in the viewfinder, which is swung out of the light path when the exposure is made and causing the viewfinder ... The first camera to employ the pellicle mirror as a beam splitter was the Canon Pellix, launched by Canon Camera Company Inc ...

Famous quotes containing the word cameras:

    While the music is performed, the cameras linger savagely over the faces of the audience. What a bottomless chasm of vacuity they reveal! Those who flock round the Beatles, who scream themselves into hysteria, whose vacant faces flicker over the TV screen, are the least fortunate of their generation, the dull, the idle, the failures . . .
    Paul Johnson (b. 1928)