Skeleton Canyon

Skeleton Canyon is located 30 miles (50 km) northeast of the town of Douglas, Arizona, in the Peloncillo Mountains, which straddles the modern Arizona and New Mexico state line, in the New Mexico Bootheel region.

This canyon connects the Animas Valley of New Mexico with the San Simon Valley of Arizona, and was once a main route between the United States and Mexico. While originally known as Guadalupe Canyon, the area became called Skeleton Canyon, as a result of the bones of cows and humans left behind from cattle drives from Mexico.

Geronimo's final surrender to General Miles on September 4, 1886, occurred at the western edge of this canyon. As the actual surrender site is now on private property, there is a commemorative surrender monument to the northwest along SR 80 where it intersects with Skeleton Canyon Road, in Arizona, at geographic coordinates 31°41′28″N 109°07′56″W / 31.69111°N 109.13222°W / 31.69111; -109.13222. The mouth of the canyon lies about 9.5 mi (15.3 km) to the southeast just west of the Arizona – New Mexico line.

Other articles related to "skeleton canyon, canyon":

Skeleton Canyon Massacres
... The Skeleton Canyon Massacres refer to two separate attacks on Mexican citizens in 1879 and 1881 ... Skeleton Canyon is located in the Peloncillo Mountains (Hidalgo County), which straddles the modern Arizona and New Mexico state line border ... This canyon connects the Animas Valley of New Mexico with the San Simon Valley of Arizona ...

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