Six Physical Education Games and Activities Your Elementary Students Will Love

Famous quotes containing the words students, love, elementary, physical, education, games and/or activities:

    The fetish of the great university, of expensive colleges for young women, is too often simply a fetish. It is not based on a genuine desire for learning. Education today need not be sought at any great distance. It is largely compounded of two things, of a certain snobbishness on the part of parents, and of escape from home on the part of youth. And to those who must earn quickly it is often sheer waste of time. Very few colleges prepare their students for any special work.
    Mary Roberts Rinehart (1876–1958)

    Falling in love with love
    Is falling for make-believe.
    Lorenz Hart (1895–1943)

    As if paralyzed by the national fear of ideas, the democratic distrust of whatever strikes beneath the prevailing platitudes, it evades all resolute and honest dealing with what, after all, must be every healthy literature’s elementary materials.
    —H.L. (Henry Lewis)

    It seems to me that physical sickness softens, just as moral sickness hardens, the heart.
    Philip Dormer Stanhope, 4th Earl Chesterfield (1694–1773)

    One is rarely an impulsive innovator after the age of sixty, but one can still be a very fine orderly and inventive thinker. One rarely procreates children at that age, but one is all the more skilled at educating those who have already been procreated, and education is procreation of another kind.
    —G.C. (Georg Christoph)

    In 1600 the specialization of games and pastimes did not extend beyond infancy; after the age of three or four it decreased and disappeared. From then on the child played the same games as the adult, either with other children or with adults. . . . Conversely, adults used to play games which today only children play.
    Philippe Ariés (20th century)

    If it is to be done well, child-rearing requires, more than most activities of life, a good deal of decentering from one’s own needs and perspectives. Such decentering is relatively easy when a society is stable and when there is an extended, supportive structure that the parent can depend upon.
    David Elkind (20th century)