Siege of Orléans

The Siege of Orléans (1428–1429) marked a turning point in the Hundred Years' War between France and England. This was Joan of Arc's first major military victory and the first major French success to follow the crushing defeat at Agincourt in 1415. The outset of this siege marked the pinnacle of English power during the later stages of the war. The city held strategic and symbolic significance to both sides of the conflict. The consensus among contemporaries was that the English regent, John Plantagenet, would succeed in realizing Henry V's dream of conquering all of France if Orléans fell. For half a year the English appeared to be winning, but the siege collapsed nine days after Joan's arrival.

Read more about Siege Of OrléansBattle of The Herrings, Joan's Arrival At Orléans, Lifting The Siege, End of The Siege, Aftermath

Other related articles:

Siege Of Orléans - Aftermath
... had suffered a setback and tremendous losses at Orléans itself, the surrounding perimeter of the Orleanais region - Beaugency, Meung, Janville, Jargeau - was still in their hands ... Indeed, it was possible for the English to reorganize and resume the siege of Orléans itself soon after, this time perhaps with more success, as the bridge was now repaired, and thus more susceptible to being ... Leaving Orléans, she met the Dauphin Charles outside of Tours on May 13, to report her victory ...

Famous quotes containing the words siege of and/or siege:

    One likes people much better when they’re battered down by a prodigious siege of misfortune than when they triumph.
    Virginia Woolf (1882–1941)

    One likes people much better when they’re battered down by a prodigious siege of misfortune than when they triumph.
    Virginia Woolf (1882–1941)