Shuttler - Equipment - Shuttlecock

Shuttlecock

A shuttlecock (often abbreviated to shuttle; also called a birdie) is a high-drag projectile, with an open conical shape: the cone is formed from sixteen overlapping feathers embedded into a rounded cork base. The cork is covered with thin leather or synthetic material.

Synthetic shuttles are often used by recreational players to reduce their costs as feathered shuttles break easily. These nylon shuttles may be constructed with either natural cork or synthetic foam base, and a plastic skirt.

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Other articles related to "shuttlecock":

Shuttler - Equipment - Shuttlecock
... A shuttlecock (often abbreviated to shuttle also called a birdie) is a high-drag projectile, with an open conical shape the cone is formed from sixteen overlapping feathers ...
Shuttler - Comparisons With Other Racquet Sports - Distinctive Characteristics of The Shuttlecock - Spin
... it with an angled racket face) to produce such spin but, since the shuttlecock is not allowed to bounce, this does not apply to badminton ... Slicing the shuttlecock so that it spins, however, does have applications, and some are particular to badminton ... See Basic strokes for an explanation of technical terms.) Slicing the shuttlecock from the side may cause it to travel in a different direction from the direction suggested by the player's racket ...
Shuttlecock - Specifications
... A shuttlecock weighs around 4.75 to 5.50 grams (0.168 to 0.194 oz) ... It has 16 feathers with each feather 70 millimetres (2.8 in) in length ...
Shuttler - Strokes - Vertical Position of The Shuttlecock
... When the shuttlecock is well below net height, players have no choice but to hit upwards ... Lifts, where the shuttlecock is hit upwards to the back of the opponents' court, can be played from all parts of the court ... his only remaining option is to push the shuttlecock softly back to the net in the forecourt this is called a netshot in the midcourt or rearcourt, it is often called a push or block ...
Shuttler
... Players score points by striking a shuttlecock with their racquet so that it passes over the net and lands in their opponents' half of the court ... Each side may only strike the shuttlecock once before it passes over the net ... A rally ends once the shuttlecock has struck the floor, or if a fault has been called by either the umpire or service judge or, in their absence, the offending player, at any time ...