Shift Pattern

Some articles on shift pattern, pattern, shift, shifts, patterns:

Gear Stick - Shift Pattern - Automatic Transmission
... Automatic transmissions traditionally have had a straight pattern beginning at the most forward position with "park" (which locks up the transmission), and running through reverse ... left-hand "arm", some on the right, and there is a sideways movement at the rear of the pattern ... such as the Alfa Romeo Sportronic have a traditional automatic shift pattern to the right, with a special position to the left in which movement of the ...
Brain Warp - Brain Shift
... "Brain Shift" redirects here ... For the neurological condition, see Midline shift ... Warp, a tabletop electronic audio game called Brain Shift ...
Manual Driving Technique - Gear Shift Types - Sequential Manual
... instead of the synchromesh dog clutch common on H-pattern automotive transmissions), in which case the clutch is only necessary when selecting first or reverse gear from ... to sensors which instruct a transmission computer to perform a shift—many of these systems can be switched into an automatic mode, where the computer ... the sequence is to make it quicker to shift from first to second when moving ...
Norman Bettison - Career - Chief Constable of West Yorkshire Police
... office as Chief Constable of West Yorkshire Police, Sir Norman ordered a review of shifts worked by officers claiming they did not provide the best service ... A new shift pattern consisting of two distinct patterns referred to as VSA 1 and VSA 2 (variable shift arrangement) was produced and commenced in ... Division were allowed to continue working the more popular previous shift pattern, FSDR (Force Standard Duty Rosta) as Communications Division had been able to successfully ...

Famous quotes containing the words pattern and/or shift:

    His talent was as natural as the pattern that was made by the dust on a butterfly’s wings. At one time he understood it no more than the butterfly did and he did not know when it was brushed or marred. Later he became conscious of his damaged wings and of their construction and he learned to think and could not fly any more because the love of flight was gone and he could only remember when it had been effortless.
    Ernest Hemingway (1899–1961)

    Ghosts, we hope, may be always with us—that is, never too far out of the reach of fancy. On the whole, it would seem they adapt themselves well, perhaps better than we do, to changing world conditions—they enlarge their domain, shift their hold on our nerves, and, dispossessed of one habitat, set up house in another. The universal battiness of our century looks like providing them with a propitious climate ...
    Elizabeth Bowen (1899–1973)