She Wore A Yellow Ribbon

She Wore a Yellow Ribbon is a 1949 Western film directed by John Ford and starring John Wayne. The academy award winning film was the second of Ford's Cavalry trilogy films (the other two being Fort Apache (1948) and Rio Grande (1950)). With a budget of $1.6 million, the color film was one of the most expensive Westerns made up to that time. It was a major hit for RKO.

The film was shot on location in Monument Valley utilizing large areas of the Navajo reservation along the Arizona-Utah state border. Cinematographer Winton Hoch won an academy award for Best Color Cinematography in 1949. Ford and Hoch based much of the film's imagery on the paintings and sculptures of Frederic Remington.

The film takes its name from the popular US military song, "She Wore a Yellow Ribbon" is used to keep marching cadence.

Read more about She Wore A Yellow Ribbon:  Plot, Cast

Other articles related to "she wore a yellow ribbon":

She Wore A Yellow Ribbon - Production - Filming
... Although the film's cinematographer, Winton Hoch, won an academy award for his work, filming was not a smooth creative process because of conflicts with Ford ... Ironically one of the most iconic scenes from the film was created from a dispute ...

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