Shaping (psychology)

Shaping (psychology)

Shaping is a conditioning procedure used primarily in the experimental analysis of behavior. The method used is differential reinforcement of successive approximations. It was introduced by B.F. Skinner with pigeons and extended to dogs, dolphins, humans and other species. In shaping, the form of an existing response is gradually changed across successive trials towards a desired target behavior by rewarding exact segments of behavior. Skinner's explanation of shaping was this:

We first give the bird food when it turns slightly in the direction of the spot from any part of the cage. This increases the frequency of such behavior. We then withhold reinforcement until a slight movement is made toward the spot. This again alters the general distribution of behavior without producing a new unit. We continue by reinforcing positions successively closer to the spot, then by reinforcing only when the head is moved slightly forward, and finally only when the beak actually makes contact with the spot. ... The original probability of the response in its final form is very low; in some cases it may even be zero. In this way we can build complicated operants which would never appear in the repertoire of the organism otherwise. By reinforcing a series of successive approximations, we bring a rare response to a very high probability in a short time. ... The total act of turning toward the spot from any point in the box, walking toward it, raising the head, and striking the spot may seem to be a functionally coherent unit of behavior; but it is constructed by a continual process of differential reinforcement from undifferentiated behavior, just as the sculptor shapes his figure from a lump of clay.

Read more about Shaping (psychology):  Successive Approximations, Practical Applications, Autoshaping

Other articles related to "shaping":

Shaping (psychology) - Autoshaping
... In autoshaping, in contrast to shaping food comes irrespective of the behavior of the animal ... Skinner's assertion that one must employ shapingas a method for teaching a pigeon to peck a key ... After all, if an animal can shape itself, why use the laborious process of shaping Autoshaping also contradicts Skinner's principle of reinforcement ...

Famous quotes containing the word shaping:

    Lovers and madmen have such seething brains,
    Such shaping fantasies, that apprehend
    More than cool reason ever comprehends.
    The lunatic, the lover, and the poet
    Are of imagination all compact.
    William Shakespeare (1564–1616)