Shannon Falls Provincial Park

Shannon Falls Provincial Park is a provincial park in British Columbia, Canada. It is located 58 kilometers (36 mi) from Vancouver and 2 kilometers (1.2 mi) south of Squamish along the Sea to Sky Highway. Shannon Falls is the third highest waterfall in British Columbia.

The park covers an area of 87 hectares (210 acres). The main point of interest is Shannon Falls, the third highest waterfall in BC, where water falls from a height of 335 meters (1,099 ft). The falls are named after a William Shannon who first settled the property in 1889 and made bricks in the area.

The park also protects the surrounding area on the north-east shore of the Howe Sound.

Just to the north are Murrin Provincial Park and Stawamus Chief Provincial Park. Located immediately across the highway from Shannon Falls is a privately operated campground and restaurant, plus the entrance to the Darrell Bay ferry terminal for Woodfibre (Darrell Bay was formerly named Shannon Bay).

The falls and adjoining woods are commonly used in television and film production.

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