Sex and Psychology - Avoidance or Approach To Moderately Negative Stimuli

Avoidance or Approach To Moderately Negative Stimuli

Further information: News values#Evolutionary perspectives

Men and women differ on average how they respond to moderately negative stimuli which may have evolutionary causes as well as implications regarding (negative) news consumption and knowledge of public affairs.

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Famous quotes containing the words stimuli, negative, avoidance, approach and/or moderately:

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    For those parents from lower-class and minority communities ... [who] have had minimal experience in negotiating dominant, external institutions or have had negative and hostile contact with social service agencies, their initial approaches to the school are often overwhelming and difficult. Not only does the school feel like an alien environment with incomprehensible norms and structures, but the families often do not feel entitled to make demands or force disagreements.
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    A novel which survives, which withstands and outlives time, does do something more than merely survive. It does not stand still. It accumulates round itself the understanding of all these persons who bring to it something of their own. It acquires associations, it becomes a form of experience in itself, so that two people who meet can often make friends, find an approach to each other, because of this one great common experience they have had ...
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    Ah, yet, ere I descend to the grave,
    May I a small house and large garden have;
    And a few friends, and many books, both true,
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    And good as guardian angels are,
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