Serpent Mound - Recent History

Recent History

The Serpent Mound was first mapped by Euro-Americans as early as 1815. In 1846 it was surveyed for the Smithsonian Institution by two Chillicothe men, Ephraim G. Squier and Edwin Hamilton Davis. Their book Ancient Monuments of the Mississippi Valley (1848), published by the Smithsonian, included a detailed description and map of the serpent mound. Because they found large trees at the site, it is believed it was hidden by natural woodland for much of the time.

Read more about this topic:  Serpent Mound

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