Septimania

Septimania (French: Septimanie, ; Occitan: Septimània, ; Catalan: Septimània, ) was the western region of the Roman province of Gallia Narbonensis that passed under the control of the Visigoths in 462, when Septimania was ceded to their king, Theodoric II. Under the Visigoths it was known as simply Gallia or Narbonensis. It corresponded roughly with the modern French region of Languedoc-Roussillon. It passed briefly to the Emirate of Córdoba in the eighth century before its conquest by the Franks, who by the end of the ninth century termed it Gothia or the Gothic March (Marca Gothica).

Septimania was a march of the Carolingian Empire and then West Francia down to the thirteenth century, though it was culturally and politically separate from northern France and the central royal government. The region was under the influence of the Toulousain, Provence, and Catalonia. It was part of the cultural and linguistic region named Occitania that was finally brought within the control of the French kings in the early 13th century as a result of the Albigensian Crusade after which it came under French governors. From the end of the thirteenth century it was known as Languedoc and its history is tied up with that of France.

The name "Septimania" may derive from part of the Roman name of the city of Béziers, Colonia Julia Septimanorum Beaterrae, which in turn alludes to the settlement of veterans of the Roman VII Legion in the city. Another possible derivation of the name is in reference to the seven cities (civitates) of the territory: Béziers, Elne, Agde, Narbonne, Lodève, Maguelonne, and Nîmes. Septimania extended to a line half-way between the Mediterranean and the Garonne River in the northwest; in the east the Rhône separated it from Provence; and to the south its boundary was formed by the Pyrenees.

Read more about Septimania:  Muslim Septimania, Gothia in Carolingian Times

Other articles related to "septimania":

Septimania Timeline - Frankish Reconquest
... around 747 The government of the Septimania region (and the Upper Mark, from the Pyrénées to the river Ebro) was given to Aumar ben Aumar ... In the Pyrenees, the Basques defeated Charlemagne's forces in the Roncesvalles Charlemagne found Septimania and the borderlands so devastated and depopulated by warfare, with the inhabitants hiding among ... He also founded several monasteries in Septimania, around which the people gathered for protection ...
Aleran
... also Count of Ampurias and Roussillon and Margrave of Septimania together with Isembart from 849 or 850 to 852 ... Aleran and Isembart campaigned against William, son of Bernat of Septimania eventually capturing the County of Barcelona in 850 ... Preceded by William of Septimania Count of Barcelona 849/850–851/852 (together with Isembart) Succeeded by Odalric ...
Septimania Timeline - Postscript
... Septimania became known as Gothia after the reign of Charlemagne ... as Foix, and the name "Gothia" (along with the older name "Septimania") faded away during the 10th century, except as a traditional designation as the region fractured into smaller ...
Bernard Of Septimania
... Bernard (or Bernat) of Septimania (795–844), son of William of Gellone, was the Frankish Duke of Septimania and Count of Barcelona from 826 to 832 and again from 835 to his ...
Septimania - Gothia in Carolingian Times
... The Frankish king found Septimania and the borderlands so devastated and depopulated by warfare, with the inhabitants hiding among the mountains, that ... Charlemagne also founded several monasteries in Septimania, around which the people gathered for protection ... Beyond Septimania to the south Charlemagne established the Spanish Marches in the borderlands of his empire ...