Selina Branning - Dotty Cotton

Dotty Cotton

Kirsty "Dotty" Cotton is a fictional character from the BBC soap opera EastEnders, played by Molly Conlin. She was introduced on 26 December 2008 as the daughter of established character Nick Cotton (John Altman). Dotty was used as Nick's partner in crime, as the duo planned to kill her grandmother Dot (June Brown) and inherit the money from her will. She and Dot subsequently became friends after the Nick's failed murder attempt, due to Dotty sabotaging their murder plan at last minute. In her final storyline, airing on 23 February 2010, she left with her mother Sandy (Caroline Pegg), whom she had believed to be dead.

Critics disliked Dotty, with her accent being criticised by Jane Simon from The Daily Mirror and critics from The Guardian and The Daily Mirror glad to see her leave. However, executive producer, Diederick Santer praised Conlin for her potrayl of Dotty and both Brown and Altman opined that the storyline was one of their highlights. The Sun described her as "one of the youngest, most wicked female soap villains".

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Other articles related to "dotty cotton, dotty, cotton":

List Of East Enders Characters (2008) - Dotty Cotton
... Kirsty "Dotty" Cotton is a fictional character from the BBC soap opera EastEnders, played by Molly Conlin ... December 2008 as the daughter of established character Nick Cotton (John Altman) ... Dotty was used as Nick's partner in crime, as the duo planned to kill her grandmother Dot (June Brown) and inherit the money from her will ...

Famous quotes containing the words cotton and/or dotty:

    It is remarkable with what pure satisfaction the traveler in these woods will reach his camping-ground on the eve of a tempestuous night like this, as if he had got to his inn, and, rolling himself in his blanket, stretch himself on his six-feet-by-two bed of dripping fir twigs, with a thin sheet of cotton for roof, snug as a meadow-mouse in its nest.
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