Seed - Seed Functions

Seed Functions

Seeds serve several functions for the plants that produce them. Key among these functions are nourishment of the embryo, dispersal to a new location, and dormancy during unfavorable conditions. Seeds fundamentally are means of reproduction, and most seeds are the product of sexual reproduction which produces a remixing of genetic material and phenotype variability on which natural selection acts.

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Seed Functions - Seed Dormancy
... Seed dormancy has two main functions the first is synchronizing germination with the optimal conditions for survival of the resulting seedling the second is spreading germination of a batch of seeds ... Seed dormancy is defined as a seed failing to germinate under environmental conditions optimal for germination, normally when the environment is at a suitable ... dormancy or innate dormancy is therefore caused by conditions within the seed that prevent germination ...

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