Secondary Neoplasm

Secondary Neoplasm

Neoplasm (from ancient Greek νεο- neo-, "new" + πλάσμα plasma, "formation", "creation") is an abnormal mass of tissue as a result of neoplasia. Neoplasia is the abnormal growth or division of cells. Prior to neoplasia, cells often undergo an abnormal pattern of growth, such as metaplasia or dysplasia. However, metaplasia or dysplasia do not always progress to neoplasia. The growth of neoplastic cells exceeds, and is not coordinated with, that of the normal tissues around it. The growth persists in the same excessive manner even after cessation of the stimuli. It usually causes a lump or tumor. Neoplasms may be benign, pre-malignant (carcinoma in situ) or malignant (cancer).

In modern medicine, the term tumor means a neoplasm that has formed a lump. In the past, the term tumor was used differently. Some neoplasms do not cause a lump.

Read more about Secondary NeoplasmTypes, Difficulty of Definition, Neoplasia Vs. Tumor

Other articles related to "secondary neoplasm, secondary":

Chemotherapy - Adverse Effects - Secondary Neoplasm
... Development of secondary neoplasia after successful chemotherapy and/or radiotherapy treatment can occur ... The most common secondary neoplasm is secondary acute myeloid leukemia, which develops primarily after treatment with alkylating agents or topoisomerase inhibitors ... cancer are more than 13 times as likely to get a secondary neoplasm during the 30 years after treatment than the general population ...

Famous quotes containing the word secondary:

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