SDS-PAGE - Silver Staining

Silver Staining

In the 14th century the silver staining technique was developed for colouring the surface of glass. It has been used extensively for this purpose since the 16th century. The colour produced by the early silver stains ranged between light yellow and an orange-red. Camillo Golgi perfected the silver staining for the study of the nervous system. Golgi's method stains a limited number of cells at random in their entirety. The exact chemical mechanism by which this happens is still largely unknown. Silver staining was introduced by Kerenyi and Gallyas as a sensitive procedure to detect trace amounts of proteins in gels. The technique has been extended to the study of other biological macromolecules that have been separated in a variety of supports. Classical Coomassie Brilliant Blue staining can usually detect a 50 ng protein band, Silver staining increases the sensitivity typically 50 times. Many variables can influence the colour intensity and every protein has its own staining characteristics; clean glassware, pure reagents and water of highest purity are the key points to successful staining.

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Other articles related to "silver staining, staining, silver":

Silver Stain - History
... Camillo Golgi perfected silver staining for the study of the nervous system ... Silver staining was introduced by Kerenyi and Gallyas as a sensitive procedure to detect trace amounts of proteins in gels ... Classical Coomassie Brilliant Blue staining can usually detect a 50 ng protein band silver staining increases the sensitivity typically 50 times ...
Staining Dyes - In Vivo Vs In Vitro - Specific Techniques - Silver Staining
... Silver staining is the use of silver to stain histologic sections ... This kind of staining is important especially to show proteins (for example type III collagen) and DNA ... Silver staining is also used in temperature gradient gel electrophoresis ...

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