SDRAM History

Although the concept of synchronous DRAM has been known since at least the 1970s and was used with early Intel processors, it was only in 1993 that SDRAM began its path to universal acceptance in the electronics industry. In 1993, Samsung introduced its KM48SL2000 synchronous DRAM, and by 2000, SDRAM had replaced virtually all other types of DRAM in modern computers, because of its greater performance.

SDRAM latency is not inherently lower (faster) than asynchronous DRAM. Indeed, early SDRAM was somewhat slower than contemporaneous burst EDO DRAM due to the additional logic. The benefits of SDRAM's internal buffering come from its ability to interleave operations to multiple banks of memory, thereby increasing effective bandwidth.

Today, virtually all SDRAM is manufactured in compliance with standards established by JEDEC, an electronics industry association that adopts open standards to facilitate interoperability of electronic components. JEDEC formally adopted its first SDRAM standard in 1993 and subsequently adopted other SDRAM standards, including those for DDR, DDR2 and DDR3 SDRAM.

SDRAM is also available in registered varieties, for systems that require greater scalability such as servers and workstations.

As of 2007, 168-pin SDRAM DIMMs are not used in new PC systems, and 184-pin DDR memory has been mostly superseded. DDR2 SDRAM is the most common type used with new PCs, and DDR3 motherboards and memory are widely available, and less expensive than still-popular DDR2 products.

Today, the world's largest manufacturers of SDRAM include: Samsung Electronics, Panasonic, Micron Technology, and Hynix.

Read more about this topic:  SDRAM

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