Scramble (video Game) - Reception and Legacy

Reception and Legacy

Scramble was critically acclaimed in its time. In 1982, Arcade Express gave the dedicated Tomytronic version of the game a score of 9 out of 10, describing it as an "engrossing" game that "rates as one of the year's best so far."

The direct sequel to Scramble was the helicopter arcade game Super Cobra. Unlike Scramble, Super Cobra was widely ported to video game systems and home computers of the time.

An updated version of Scramble is available in Konami Collector's Series: Arcade Advanced by inputting the Konami Code in the game's title screen. This version allows three different ships to be chosen: the Renegade, the Shori, and the Gunslinger. The only difference between the ships besides their appearance are the shots they fire. The Renegade's shots are the same as in the original Scramble, the Shori has rapid-fire capabilities triggered by holding down the fire button, and the Gunslinger's shots can pierce through enemies, meaning they can be used for multiple hits with a single shot.

According to the Nintendo Game Boy Advance Gradius Galaxies intro and the Gradius Breakdown DVD included with Gradius V, Scramble is considered the first in the "Gradius" series.

However, the Gradius Portable guidebook issued a few years after by Konami, lists Scramble as part of their shooting history, and the Gradius games are now listed separately

Scramble was included on Konami Arcade Classics in 1999.

Scramble joined the Xbox Live Arcade library for the Xbox 360 on September 13, 2006, its release having been delayed from September 6, 2006 due to bugs.

Scramble made the list of Top 100 arcade games in the Guinness World Records Gamer's Edition

Scramble was made available on Microsoft's Game Room service for its Xbox 360 console and for Windows-based PCs on March 24, 2010.

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