Scientific Audio Electronics

Scientific Audio Electronics (SAE) was an audio electronics maker founded in 1968 by Morris Kessler, along with Ted and Beth Winchester. For several years the only product was a power amplifier called the Mark II, a product which satisfied Winchester's "Screwdriver Test" requirement that a power amp be able to withstand a sudden direct short while operating at full power at any frequency within the audio bandwidth.

Within a year after the start of the company, export was accomplished by a combination export firm operating as “SAE International.” Export sales amounted to more than 50% of SAE's total production. The export manager was Charles Gassett, who was also a principal in Soundcraftsmen.

Other early audio pioneers at SAE were Ed Miller, previously at Sherwood Electronic Labs in Chicago and James Bongiorno, who went on to found GAS (Great American Sound) and Sumo. In 1985, SAE was sold to DAK Industries, but folded in 1992 when the parent company went into bankruptcy. SAE was based in Los Angeles, California and enjoyed a large following of audiophiles.

Source

  • http://www.wardsweb.org/audio/sae_history.html

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