Science and Technology in The United Kingdom

Science and technology in the United Kingdom has a long history, producing many important figures and developments in the field. Major theorists from the UK include Isaac Newton whose laws of motion and illumination of gravity have been seen as a keystone of modern science and Charles Darwin whose theory of evolution by natural selection was fundamental to the development of modern biology. Major scientific discoveries include hydrogen by Henry Cavendish, penicillin by Alexander Fleming, and the structure of DNA, by Francis Crick and others. Major engineering projects and applications pursued by people from the UK include the steam locomotive developed by Richard Trevithick and Andrew Vivian, the jet engine by Frank Whittle and the World Wide Web by Tim Berners-Lee. Scientists from the UK continue to play a major role in the development of science and technology and major technological sectors include the aerospace, motor and pharmaceutical industries.

Read more about Science And Technology In The United Kingdom:  Important Advances Made in The UK, Technology-based Industries, Scientific Research

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Science And Technology In The United Kingdom - Scientific Research
... universities, with many establishing science parks to facilitate production and co-operation with industry ... and had an 8% share of scientific citations, the third- and second-highest in the world (after the United States and China and the United States respectively) ...

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