Schoharie Crossing State Historic Site

Schoharie Crossing State Historic Site, also known as Erie Canal National Historic Landmark, is a historic district that includes the ruins of the Erie Canal aqueduct over Schoharie Creek, and a 3.5-mile (5.6 km) long part of the Erie Canal, in the towns of Glen and Florida within Montgomery County, New York. It is the only part of the old canal that has been designated a National Historic Landmark.

Schoharie Crossing State Historic Site is the only location where all three phases of New York's Canals can be seen at once. In addition to the Schoharie Aqueduct, the only two remaining locks of the original canal can be found at Schoharie Crossing, as well as three enlarged canal locks and one barge canal lock.

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Schoharie Crossing State Historic Site - See Also
... Schoharie Creek Bridge collapse, modern era example of power of Schoharie Creek. ...

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